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Power of Art Celebrated in New Community Exhibition Series

PRESS CONTACT: Julian Rankin jrankin@msmuseumart.org | 601.960.1515

For Immediate Release: November 17, 2015

Mississippi Museum of Art Launches New Community Exhibition Series Featuring Work by Participants in Nonprofit Visual Arts Programs

Painted by Willie Green of Panola, MS

(Jackson, Miss…) The Mississippi Museum of Art (the Museum) is proud to announce a new series of exhibitions showcasing work created through nonprofit art programs in communities throughout the state. The Art in Us All Community Exhibition Series was created in order to deepen the relationship between the Museum and its visitors and to cultivate creativity in the community for people of all ages and backgrounds. Through this series, the Museum develops partnerships with Mississippi nonprofits who incorporate visual art into their social service work. Art in Us All exhibitions are free and open to the public. The first exhibition in this series, on view through Sunday, December 13, features work made by the participants of HeARTWorks, an art ministry serving clients of Stewpot Community Services in Jackson. The motto of the ministry, embodied...

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Posted on Monday, November 16, 2015 by MMA

Marie Hull - Adventures in Abstraction

Part of an ongoing series on Mississippi artist Marie Hull, showcased in this Fall and Winter’s celebratory exhibition, Bright Fields: The Mastery of Marie Hull.

Marie Hull (1890-1980), Abstract Composition, 1950s. MMA 1981.279i_p.195

Over the course of the second half of her career—from 1945 onward—Marie Hull worked not in one but in various styles which reflect the different strategies of artists who made up the so-called New York School of Abstract Expressionism. These artists were on the “cutting edge” of modern art as it flourished in New York City in the second half of the 20th century, promoted by a phalanx of sophisticated dealers, gallerists, and critics who saw in that art a vigorous and genuine expression of the creative energy of the New World, as opposed to the Old. Mrs. Hull traveled frequently to New York but also to cities such as Chicago and Philadelphia where gallery exhibitions (followed, cautiously, by those at museums) celebrated their new heroes—much to the chagrin of the American public,...

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Posted on Sunday, November 15, 2015 by MMA

Marie Hull - New World, New Directions

Part of an ongoing series on Mississippi artist Marie Hull, showcased in this Fall and Winter’s celebratory exhibition, Bright Fields: The Mastery of Marie Hull.

Marie Hull (1890-1980), Colorado Landscape, 1930s(?). MMA 1981.279aa_p.14

So far as we know, there are very few paintings that are dated or documented to the years of the United States’ participation in World War II (1941-45). There is something of a gap in our knowledge of Marie Hull’s personal artistic evolution, but it may well be that these were years of consolidation for her. It seems likely she would have stayed close to home during the War years, when commodities such as gasoline were rationed, and therefore that many of the familiar depictions of rural life in Mississippi date from this period. It likewise would have been the perfect opportunity to use the drawings and watercolors from her travel-books to paint pictures of the American landscape, especially of the American and Canadian Rocky Mountains which the Hulls had visited shortly before the outbreak...

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Posted on Sunday, November 8, 2015 by MMA

Marie Hull - Hard Times: the 1930s

Part of an ongoing series on Mississippi artist Marie Hull, showcased in this Fall and Winter’s celebratory exhibition, Bright Fields: The Mastery of Marie Hull.

Marie Hull (1890-1980), Annie Smith, 1928. oil on board. Collection of the Fielding Wright Art Center, Delta State University. Photograph copyright ©Will Jacks.

The Wall Street Crash of 1929 began in October, while Marie Hull was still in Morocco. Once the Great Depression took hold, many aspects of life changed for most Americans. For the Hulls the Hard Times meant there was much less demand, from fewer clients, for Emmett’s architectural services, and for Marie it meant there was much less “spare money” to pay for little luxuries such as the classes she taught for both children and adults. Later she would recall that, with everybody in the same boat, friends and neighbors had to barter for goods and services and therefore she would happily exchange an hour of teaching for a gallon of gasoline for her car, or a peck of fresh okra. It...

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Posted on Sunday, November 1, 2015 by MMA